Tag Archives: training

Rider profile: Liam Stevens

Will you be competing in the main Derby 2018? What horse/s will you be competing on? Yes I’m hoping to have two horses for this year’s Derby. Nissan Wanda who has been placed twice in previous years and Linda Ellerine’s Back on Track Quintino 4. It will be his first time around. Those are the only two horses that I ...

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Rider profile: Mandy Johnston

By Caroline Malan Photos: Jacqui S Woods 1. Why will you not be competing in the main Derby 2018? Lambus is quite a quirky sensitive horse and is not overly keen on the “funnies” in the Derby track – the steps, the bank, the road crossing etc. I have formed such a great partnership with him and don’t want to ...

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The Callaho Stud auction day

In the last article we gave you some insight into our preparatory work between auctions. Here, we provide more detail regarding exactly what is entailed. The auction is a team commitment. There are no specific individuals who stand out. From the car guard on the road all the way through to the stud manager, each plays an essential designated role. ...

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Muscle up: conditioning your horse

Muscle is the most adaptive tissue in the body in that it can grow and develop with training and degenerate and become weaker during periods of inactivity. Trained muscle is more efficient because: It has an increased number in the size and type of muscle fibres, which make up the muscle. It has an increased blood supply, so more nutrients ...

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What is the maximum weight that a recreational horse can carry?

Horses can carry between 12% and 20% of their body weight, but body weight is not the only factor that decides if it is justified to carry a certain amount of weight. You have to look at the muscles, build and breed of the horse in order to make a safe observation and conclusion. Is the back weak or strong? ...

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What does it mean if a rider has a hot seat?

A ‘hot seat’ is a pushy seat where the rider sits ‘on top’ of the horse, instead of ‘around’ the horse and ‘in’ the saddle. The cause of this problem could be a number of things and most often it can be traced back to the centre of the body: the buttocks, lower abdomen, lower back, pelvis and seat bones. ...

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What are signs that a horse is resisting the contact?

The most obvious sign that a horse has not accepted the contact is resistance. This can be displayed through snatching, falling behind, grabbing and hollowing. Snatching Horses usually snatch at the reins when you grip them too tightly. This can usually be fixed by gently sponging to encourage softness and suppleness. Don’t confuse this with sawing (pulling the bit from ...

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How can you teach a horse to be more reactive to the aids?

The principle of action is reaction. Horses naturally yield away from pressure. It is very helpful to teach the horse to move away from pressure, like in the washing place when you ask the horse to step aside. For example, when you place your hand on the hindquarters (action) and the horse steps aside to make room for you (reaction), ...

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When is a horse considered ‘on the bit?’

Riders in today’s age have lost sight of what it means for a horse to be ‘on the bit’. The expression has become associated with submission and obedience of the horse, and the aesthetic look of the horse with his head down and ‘in a frame’. Although we don’t know where the actual expression came from, being ‘on the bit’ ...

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Creating connections: what true contact should feel like

Riding can sometimes be an overwhelming minefield of both terminology and analogy, leaving the rider not entirely sure of what they are meant to be striving for. Here we demystify one of the most basic and yet complex concepts: the contact. We discuss what it means, what it should feel like, and how you can achieve a good hand-holding with your ...

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